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Criminals steal identities through many ways. For example, they could steal bank cards and credit cards, phish for “personal information” via email, steal Social Security cards, etc. (McGill and Morales 2013). While thieves could steal “Social Security [numbers] on Medicare and Medicaid cards” for people’s...

When dentists “cannot work due to injury or illness,” their clinics continue their operations, but dentists must worry about their overhead (Samaras 2008). Insurance for overhead could pay for its costs until the dentists return (Samaras 2008). Coverage for overhead, which is a significant part...

Dental insurance companies generally do not cover cosmetic procedures, which “[improves] the appearance of the teeth and mouth,” because they “prefer focusing on oral health and preventive services rather than elective procedures” (Susan 2011; “Cosmetic Dental Insurance”). For example, patients undergo teeth whitening/bleaching in order...

Sometimes, insurance companies would ask for refunds from dentists (“Top 10 Claim Concerns: ADA, NADP Share Views on Dentists’ Concerns” 2008). Unfortunately, for insurance companies, “events and state laws often conspire to further delay when the carrier can legally request the refund – a circumstance...

The Usual Customary and Reasonable (UCR) charge determines “the amount both [the patient] and [his or her] plan will contribute” within an out-of-network clinic (Ellis 2017). Dental insurance companies can determine the UCR within an area by “[recording] the fee numbers submitted by the practitioners...

Dental Billing