Galardones y Reconocimientos

Galardones y Reconocimientos

La Forma de Ser Galardonada de eAssist

 

Soluciones Dentales de eAssist es un servicio galardonado de facturación electrónica para consultorios dentales que ha ganado varios galardones y reconocimientos desde su origen. Sin las personas que trabajan incansablemente entre bastidores, hubiera sido imposible lograr ello. Además, son ellas que brindan nuestros servicios galardonados a nuestros clientes y demuestran que eAssist es número 1 en la nación de la facturación dental.

Reconocimientos de eAssist
Comunicado de Prensa

junio 4, 2019

Code Tip: D6080

D6080 Implant Maintenance Procedures When Prostheses are Removed and Reinserted, Including Cleansing of Prosthesis and Abutments CDT 2019 The only way this code can be billed is when the prostheses in removed and reinserted.  If you are cleaning around the implant this code is not applicable. This is not a per implant code but for the entire prosthesis.  The code includes scaling and debridement of the entire structure and the implant system on a per visit charge. The code also includes hygiene instruction as to home care and proper maintenance of the prosthesis and the implants. Radiographs, periodic evaluation and prophylaxis are not included in the code and can be billed separately on the claim form. Dental Billing Tips and News for Pros; Edition #136

junio 4, 2019

Marcie’s Mindfulness Moment | Feel the Feels

Have you ever felt so frustrated, sad, hurt, or angry… and you just couldn’t get over it, no matter how hard you tried?  You intellectually knew that you “needed” to let something go, yet you just couldn’t? Many of us were taught at a young age to “snap out of it, quit crying, suck it up”; or some other well-intentioned suggestion to not create a scene when experiencing strong feelings.  Unknowingly, our guardians and mentors were teaching us how to “stuff” our emotions in an effort for everything to appear ok on the outside. It’s hard to see your children struggle or experience negative feelings, so previous belief was that if we don’t focus on it, change the subject, or convince the child that they were ok then it would go away.   Modern parenting methods and psychological studies suggest that we allow ourselves to have these feelings instead of suppressing them- to feel them, identify them, welcome them even, and let them exist. Through this process, we learn what we are experiencing, what it physically feels like, how to identify it, and to actually process the event; making us more equipped to deal with the emotion at the next opportunity.  The more we try to make an unpleasant feeling go away, the higher up it floats for us and makes us deal with it! There are various techniques available to process feelings.  Some get relief from a breathing practice, physically releasing tension through various exercise modalities, taking brain breaks, trying to reset your thoughts, mindfulness awareness, setting new intentions, consulting a therapist, and a host of others.  Reprogramming our conditioned response takes effort, and even then, it’s easy to fall into old patterns. One method I’ve found particularly helpful is to provide a safe space to let all feelings out and then role play receiving empathy with a friend.  I’ve recently helped a team with an issue that was seriously upsetting, and one of the members responded quickly and suggested they just accept the situation and move on, that life isn’t fair and to keep going.  I asked if they would be open to trying a different method; to see what would happen if we let ourselves experience the feelings-- and what unfolded was remarkable! We held a space to ponder: What was bothering us?  What were we authentically feeling? Could we name it? Did it have a physical impact on our bodies? Then we played a hypothetical game: If there were no consequences, how would we want to deal with it and what did we actually want to say to get resolve; not what we thought was the “right” thing, but our truth.  I listened as they let it all out and reflected back for them what I was hearing and offered empathy around their concerns. Despite not interacting with the actual person that was directly involved, this practice actually allows your body to feel the sensation of receiving empathy around the topic and often is enough to help you process the situation and give you space to decide if an actual conversation is necessary.  The team found relief in our exercise after their needs of being heard, understood, and validated were met—and then they were ready to move on and keep going! Try it out and let me know how it goes! Dental Billing Tips and News for Pros; Edition #136

junio 4, 2019

eAssist Spotlight- Ashley Belding

Ashley Belding has been a part of the eAssist team since December 2017. To her, the most interesting part of being in the dental billing field is that there are always goals to reach. Being able to reach her goals multiple times a day is what makes it all worth it for her. Ashley applied to be an eAssist contractor because she likes to reach goals, and she works tremendously hard. With 15 years of experience working in dental offices, she wanted something new and to be able to be with her family more often. Her husband is in the air force, and with that comes relocating and having to start a new job. Most offices required her to start from the bottom and reach her way to the top, and she didn’t want to keep doing that with each move. Ashley’s favorite aspect of eAssist is the fact that the eAssist family is so dedicated to helping everyone. She has yet to come across anyone who doesn’t want the other to succeed. Everyone is always lifting each other up and continuously striving to be better. In a dental office, that can be hard to find because everyone is about themselves and there is less focus on the patient. Priscilla—an eAssist KC, says this about her, “I work with Ashley closely on other offices and although she is not in my region, she is truly a servant leader. She came on an account where the previous team did not work and she earned the trust back of the office manager. I can’t thank her enough. Every office she touches has a positive experience. She is truly an asset to eAssist.” One interesting fact about Ashley is that she has been in the dental field since she was 15 years old. She has always wanted to be apart of the dental field and she started young and never turned back. Dental Billing Tips and News for Pros; Edition #136

junio 4, 2019

Earn patient loyalty and grow practice profits with these tips

When patient retention numbers drop, it can be pretty frustrating. The dentist and the rest of the team are left wondering why patients are opting to go elsewhere for their dental care, and often start to worry about the future of the practice. Team morale suffers and so does the bottom line. Loyal patients are vital to any practice’s success, yet they can be difficult to come by. The problem is, patients decide not to return for many reasons. Maybe they thought they had to wait too long to see the dentist, or they didn’t think the team was friendly enough. If you can identify and address a few of the most common reasons patients never return, you’ll see your patient base start to grow. Not sure where to start? That’s where I come in. Here are a few tips to help you earn patient loyalty and increase profits in your practice. Put a focus on customer service. Patients expect certain things to happen when they visit your office. They want to be greeted by friendly team members who are happy to help them in any way they can. Remember, many patients are nervous about dental appointments, so making them feel comfortable from the moment they walk in will not only put them at ease, it will help them start to feel a connection to the practice. So how can you offer better customer service? Train team members to offer patients a beverage as they wait, and to ask if they need help filling out paperwork. Team members also should answer any questions they have and assure patients they’re in great hands. These touches may seem small, but they go a long way in earning loyalty. Make them feel at home. I hate to say it, but most patients would rather be just about anywhere other than a dental office, and it certainly doesn’t help if they’re forced to sit in a sterile waiting area where they can hear the sounds of the dental instruments they’ve come to fear. It’s important to make patients feel as at home as possible while they wait. That’s why I suggest setting up your reception area more like a living room than a dentist’s office. Trade in those stiff plastic chairs for comfortable couches and paint over white walls with more soothing colors. Add in a few plants and pleasant smells and patients will be much happier when they arrive for their appointment. Another tip? Keep the outside of your office looking neat and tidy as well. If patients see an old tattered sign or a parking lot that clearly needs some work, their first impression of the practice won’t be a positive one—and that sets the tone for the entire visit. Fix your schedule. If your schedule is a mess, it’s not only wreaking havoc on your day, it’s irritating your patients. No one wants to spend their afternoon waiting to be called back for an appointment. Your patients are busy people with long lists of tasks they must complete each day. If you keep them from those tasks, chances are they’ll opt to call another dentist when it’s time for their next appointment. If your schedule seems a bit out of control these days, it’s probably time to talk with your Scheduling Coordinator. Make sure she is trained to schedule producers to meet production goals, and that she isn’t double booking anyone. Be sure to communicate appointment times to your Scheduling Coordinator as well. You’ll have a more streamlined schedule and happier patients. Build connections. When patients feel connected to a practice, they’re more likely to stay loyal. You can create these connections in various ways, including asking them about their families and their work, taking the time to address concerns they have about treatment recommendations and educating them about the importance of maintaining their oral health. Spend time getting to know your patients and making sure they understand why routine dental care is vital, and they’ll reward you with their loyalty. Add new services. Patients don’t want to go to multiple dentists for treatment, so the more you can offer in-house the better. Adding services also will help you stay passionate about what you do. Of course offering more services won’t do you much good if patients don’t know about them. Keep patients informed with monthly practice newsletters. It’s also a good idea to put educational brochures in your waiting area and to hang posters that advertise new services, whether it’s whitening, clear aligner therapy or implants. For your practice to be successful, you need loyal patients who refer you to family and friends. Follow these tips and you’ll grow your patient base and your bottom line.  Sally McKenzie is CEO of McKenzie Management, www.mckenziemgmt.com, a full-service, nation-wide dental practice management company. Contact her directly at 877-777-6151 or at sallymck@mckenziemgmt.com.   Dental Billing Tips and News for Pros; Edition #136

junio 4, 2019

How Dental Assistants can help with Dental Insurance Claims

Dental assistants are the eyes and ears of the dental care field.  The assistant sees and hears all that is happening before during and after any given procedure.  Because the dental assistant is necessary for the success of the process, their role is often downplayed when it comes to clinical record keeping. The role of the dental assistant can vary depending upon the directions given by the dentist in charge.  Working under direct supervision the dental assistant is not allowed to do certain tasks unless given specific instructions by the clinician.  Many times, the assistant will concentrate on all functions that have been communicated and will not venture outside of those job duties. According to the training book, Modern Dental Assisting 9th edition by Bird and Robinson, page 407 paragraph 6, the role of the dental assistant in the patient examination and treatment planning is made clear. The dental assistant:

  • assists the patient in the completion of patient information forms
  • Takes and records vital signs.
  • charts and documents the dentist's findings during the extraoral and intraoral examinations
  • exposes and processes intraoral and extraoral radiographs
  • takes extraoral and intraoral photographs
  • organizes the patient's record
  • prepares for the case presentation
To qualify for the case presentation, the assistant must choose the corresponding CDT codes so that the treatment plan will reflect all completed procedures and those planned for following appointments.  In many practices, this task is delegated to the front desk business staff, bypassing the dental assistant. Wrong. Removing the dental assistant from this duty disrupts the connection of clinical accuracy and doesn’t help the dental assistant complete their function to the proper care of the patient. Many dental assistants never learn the connection between clinical findings and the supporting documentation necessary to get a procedure on a dental claim paid.  This is not their fault but is the fault of the dentist and management. If they did know they would support the dentist in writing better clinical notes and would oversee that each procedure had the required documentation. In this modern dental world, there can be no separation between the “front and the back” causing disconnects in the flow of information necessary to create accurate and proper clinical records. There have been countless articles written about creating narratives from the clinical notes written by the clinical staff.  These narratives are required along with proper radiographs, periodontal charting, and other diagnostic tools. For training, please see the link to the following article: https://dentalbilling.com/building-narratives-dental-claims/ Often in practices, short cuts are taken because there is limited time to train the staff in the use of the dental software, answering the phone, collecting at the desk, filing claim forms, and the list goes on. Dedicated time to training staff must be a monthly event.  Not only will it support the positive growth of the team and the practice but will improve the care of patients and help to create better relationships for all. Training involves reading and interpretation and the application to the practice systems.   The following is a list of training materials that I feel are important to the development of the team:  
  • Practice Management for the Dental Team by Finkbeiner and Finkbeiner (the latest edition available)
  • Coding with Confidence by Charles Blair, DDS latest edition 2019
  • Administration with Confidence-the go-to guide for insurance administration current edition 2019
  • Modern Dental Assisting by Bird and Robinson  latest edition
  • The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen Covey
  • The Toyota Way 14 Management Principles from the world’s greatest manufacturer by Jeffrey Liker
  Anyone in a leadership role within a dental practice should see that continuing education happens for the entire team and that emphasis is placed on creating a better experience for the patient.   Moving from mediocre to exceptional requires a little more love and little more effort and a bit more time, and it is worth it when you see the results in the eyes of the team and the patients. Dental Billing Tips and News for Pros; Edition #136

mayo 1, 2019

Worst Claim Story- May 2019

I had a claim that Aetna kept denying, perio maint, due to lack of perio history. Aetna paid on perio maint prior in 2018 - just under a different group. The rep kept stating since no perio history on the new group they couldn’t pay out on the claim. I called every week, arguing the decision, informing them they do have prior perio history (from other dental office) and they even have it on file under the old group. Finally - the rep agreed to send the claim back into processing so I stopped calling on the claim every week. A week later - I checked on the claim and it reprocessed and paid out the full benefit! Squeaky wheel - Always gets the attention - also, just pay us. We know what we are doing! Dental Billing Tips and News for Pros; Edition #135

mayo 1, 2019

Marcie’s Mindfulness Moment | The Power of Touch

Like so many that have pursued careers in Dentistry, my passion grew from my own childhood experiences with my Dentist. Though many details of my youth are blurred, I can distinctly remember the smell of the dental office, the shiny new brush I would receive, the amazing gel fluoride foam tray, and especially the comfort I felt while in the presence of my dentist.  Without fail, at every single visit, he had a ritual.  He would gently pat my cheeks to welcome me in, chat with me, complete his exam, and follow up by tapping my nose—it felt like a “love tap”.  This created a sense of comfort, trust, and a lighthearted bonding.  As an adolescent, my family moved and subsequently had to establish a new relationship with a dentist.  Again, a bond was created and admiration ensued by the way he put me at ease- his soft touch was gently on my right cheek before he started his exam.  Fast forward 15 years to my clinical days, and my doctor would always greet his patient with a hand shake or hand clasp, and as he sat the patient back, would gently rest his hand on their right shoulder.  You could almost feel their anxiety level decrease as they let out a relaxing breath.  I’m not sure if human contact and its power is taught in Dental School, but my small sampling of experiences suggest that if it’s not, it might be a good idea!   This is the power of human touch and physical connection at work. Touch is one of our first senses to bloom in the womb, and studies have shown that it’s necessary for development and growth in our early years, and as we continue to evolve~ it helps to establish our mind-body connections.  It’s been shown to decrease pulse rate, blood pressure & anxiety- and to increase the function of our immune systems & promoting healing, fostering trust, creating connection, establishing safety & security, and encouraging cooperation.  Touch can inspire positive thinking, honesty, openness, and approachability. In our fast paced, digital world, we often miss out on the benefits of daily touch- the high five from a co-worker, a welcoming handshake, a loving hug, a kudos-to-you pat on the back, or a comforting hand on the shoulder.  We have our heads down in our phones and are constantly on the go preparing for our next task to complete and often miss opportunities for physical contact. In the coming weeks, I challenge you to set an intention to look for opportunities to deposit in other’s love banks via the power of touch.  Let me know how it goes! Dental Billing Tips and News for Pros; Edition #135

mayo 1, 2019

eAssist Spotlight- Marcie Nguyen

Marcie Nguyen has been a part of the eAssist team for the past 4 years. She loves puzzles, challenges and helping people. She loves that her job has a direct impact on the well-being of others, and that makes her happy! Marcie loved the idea of flexibility and working around her kids schedule, and the opportunity for growth, which is what first prompted her to apply to be an eAssist contractor. She initially thought it could be a scam but persisted, and when when it came to the vetting she knew no one would go through that extent if the job wasn’t for real… and she was right! Marcie’s favorite aspect of working with eAssist is guiding her teams to solutions and helping to point them in the right direction. She enjoys highlighting different ways to solve the problem and working as a team, rather than just solving the problems for them. Marcie loves the relationships and connections that she has developed over the years through eAssist. Marcie’s fellow KC Victoria, said this about her, “She is always helpful and lends a hand whenever needed. Anyone can see that she truly cares for offices and eAssisters, as well as the relationships that are created between each person. She reminds me of what it means to be compassionate and a servant leader.” One interesting fact about Marcie is that she strongly believes in the power of conscious communication and that it can dramatically influence problem solving abilities. Marcie has studied it in depth for the past 5 years and has a passion for using it to create connections. Dental Billing Tips and News for Pros; Edition #135

mayo 1, 2019

How to make your practice more service focused (and why you should)

Patients have a lot of options when it comes to finding a dental home. If they have a negative experience at your office, they won’t hesitate to make their next appointment at the practice down the street. That’s why it’s so important to create an exceptional experience for every patient you see. When patients have a “wow” experience at your practice, they’re not only more likely to stay loyal, they’re also more likely to refer your practice to family and friends. They might even be prompted to write a positive review about your office and share it on social media. Soon, your practice gets a reputation for offering top-notch care, which leads to more new patients and a healthier bottom line. So how can you make your practice more service focused so you can reap these rewards? Here are a few tips: Keep your practice comfortable and clean. Walking into a dental office with a clinical feel doesn’t exactly put patients at ease. Many are nervous about their appointment, and white walls lined with stiff chairs won’t do much to lower their anxiety. Help patients relax by creating a calming environment in your waiting area. Make it feel more like a living room than a dentist’s office with comfortable couches, soothing colors and plants. Once they’re in the chair, the dentist should ask patients how he can make them more comfortable. This might include offering them a blanket to keep them warm during the procedure. If you have a television set up, ask what they would like to watch, or give them headphones so they can listen to music. Patients will appreciate these small gestures, and might even mention them to family and friends. Your practice also should be clean and tidy—both inside and out. Make sure your sign, parking lot and the outside of your building are in tip-top shape. If they’re not, patients could have a negative impression of your office before they even walk in. You also should make sure the inside is free of clutter and that bathrooms are cleaned and stocked on a regular basis. Make them feel special. All too often, patients feel like nothing more than a number when they visit a dental practice. To them, it seems like the team’s main focus is selling them expensive dentistry. That makes it difficult for patients to trust recommendations, and leads to them looking for a second opinion. How can you avoid this? Let patients know both the dentist and the staff care about their well-being. Train team members to greet patients with a friendly smile as soon as they walk through the door. They also should help them with paperwork, address any concerns they have, offer them coffee or water as they wait and assure them they’re in good hands. It’s also important to build a rapport with your patients. Start by asking them about their family, their work and their oral health goals. Tell them about the services you provide that can help them meet their goals and take the time to educate patients about their condition and the importance of maintaining their oral health. Call patients to check on them after a procedure to see how they’re feeling. None of this takes a lot of time or effort, but it all goes a long way in making patients feel special and like you actually care. And when patients know you care, they’re much more likely to stay loyal to your practice. Make sure everyone is prepared to answer questions. Team members should feel comfortable answering common patient questions, and their answers should be consistent. If they’re not, it makes it difficult for patients to trust your practice and your recommendations. To keep messaging consistent, I suggest you track the most common questions patients ask and train team members on how to respond to them. They’ll be more confident answering questions and patients will appreciate how knowledgeable and helpful team members are.   To grow your patient base and your practice, you need a solid base of loyal patients who accept treatment and refer. Focusing on providing top-notch customer service is a great way to grow that loyal patient base. Offering exceptional patient experiences makes your practice stand out, leading to increased loyalty, more new patients and a more robust bottom line. Need more ideas to improve your customer service efforts? Feel free to reach out. As always, I’m happy to help. Sally McKenzie is CEO of McKenzie Management, www.mckenziemgmt.com, a full-service, nation-wide dental practice management company. Contact her directly at 877-777-6151 or at sallymck@mckenziemgmt.com.   Dental Billing Tips and News for Pros; Edition #135

mayo 1, 2019

Four Steps to Improve Being a Dental CEO

Over several years there have evolved many changes in the delivery of dentistry, the new and improved technology, materials, new methods of diagnosing and treatment of dental disease and the medical breakthroughs affecting the success of dental treatment and patient wellbeing. What I haven't witnessed is a significant shift from the old ways of doing dental business to newer more efficient business systems that are accessible to dentists today.  There is a big slide toward the DSO or corporate management systems that are affecting the numbers of solo dentists and even small group practices that want to forego managing their people and their overhead totals. Why the shift?  Is it because there are huge challenges in managing a dental practice that can't be overcome? In today's high tech moving at the speed of sound world, many dentists have realized,  though with trepidation, that they are entrepreneurs and business owners along with being health care providers.  Let's say there is enough accessible information out there about the business side of dentistry. The weak excuse of not being trained in business systems is not because it isn’t there it is because dentists haven’t reached out to embrace it.   Even if you say you have an experienced Office Manager to help doesn’t excuse you from being the knowledgeable CEO of your business. “We weren’t taught business in dental school.”   Ask yourself, “How long have I known that I need to learn about business and revenue management?”  A couple of decades? Stop hiding behind the excuses and get moving. All business owners want to improve their services, regardless of whether or not they consider themselves motivated to meet a goal.  My survey of what I think a successful solo or group practices have revealed some good advice:

  1.  Learn new skills and study new trends:  Say you don’t have time to read.  Sign up for Audible, www.audible.com,  to listen to learning and improving your business skills, people skills and time and money management skills.  Learn by listening to the latest business advice from the experts on any topic. Whether keeping up with dentistry journals, reading business books, or researching specific questions, all entrepreneurs report some focused continuous improvement through learning.  Attend free webinars at Viva Learning https://vivalearning.com/ for clinical and practice management learning.  Earn CE credits under PACE/CERP. Make knowledge of new skills a must for your team so that they can continuously improve their skills with patients.  Offer reward incentives to those who take the time to listen to webinars or to read trade journal articles and can then give a short talk about what they learned and what would help the practice growth positively.
  2.   Acquire a business coach experienced with the special organizational needs of a dental practice.  Everyone can use a coach. Look at the many professional athletes, and you will note that all use a coach.  Someone with years in the business to give you advice and support who also has a stellar reputation in the industry.
  3. Improve communication skills.  Want to improve your verbal communication skills for communication with patients and to present treatment presentation options, Join Toastmasters International https://www.toastmasters.org/.  Get to know other professionals from all walks of life whose goal it is to improve oral communication techniques and leadership skills plus to get the support from the group for definite and continuous improvement.
  4.  Network with other dentists or professionals in dentistry.
There are some things that you can't learn without attending workshops and structured course/classwork.  Find professional study clubs that focus on the area of dentistry that you want to improve. Here is a helpful link: https://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/2016/12/good-dental-study-clubs-are-alive-and-well.html Dental Billing Tips and News for Pros; Edition #135