Galardones y Reconocimientos

Galardones y Reconocimientos

La Forma de Ser Galardonada de eAssist

 

Soluciones Dentales de eAssist es un servicio galardonado de facturación electrónica para consultorios dentales que ha ganado varios galardones y reconocimientos desde su origen. Sin las personas que trabajan incansablemente entre bastidores, hubiera sido imposible lograr ello. Además, son ellas que brindan nuestros servicios galardonados a nuestros clientes y demuestran que eAssist es número 1 en la nación de la facturación dental.

Reconocimientos de eAssist
Comunicado de Prensa

agosto 22, 2019

eAssist Dental Solutions Places on Prestigious Inc. 5000 List of Fastest-growing Private Companies in America for Fourth Consecutive Year

Due to its exponential growth rate and exceptional client satisfaction, eAssist Dental Solutions has been placed on the Inc. 5000 listing of the nation's fastest-growing private companies. This honor comes to eAssist for the fourth year in a row, ranking at #1341. The highly-regarded designation is given out each year to entrepreneurs who are considered to be the vibrant job creators behind the American economy. Continue reading ...

agosto 6, 2019

Code Tip: D2962 Labial Veneer (Porcelain Laminate)-Laboratory

Labial veneers by definition must extend interproximally and/or cover the incisal edge.  This code includes all ceramic and porcelain veneers. Do not report a labial veneer as a ¾ procelain/ceramic crown/D2783 because this is a much more aggressive removal of tooth structure and will have less lingual enamel remaining On a virgin tooth a veneer is the better choice if it only extends interproximally than the D2783.  Because veneers require more time and skill to temporize and to deliver the fee should reflect this extra work. Although a porcelain veneer is usually considered a cosmetic procedure if the tooth/teeth have existing failed composite fillings or cracks and decay detected, this could be evidence enough for coverage but make sure to take intra-oral photos and radiographs with narrative to support the procedure.  If it is covered by a contracted amount for an in network PPO the reimbursement may be disappointing.   Dental Billing Tips and News for Pros; Edition #138

agosto 6, 2019

Marcie’s Mindfulness Moment | Relationship Building -- Your best form of advertisement

In my previous life as a hygienist, dental spouse and practice owner, I helped to build a successful business based on relationships.  Our practice model: focus on creating an experience for our patients. The physical environment we designed was more like our living room than your stereotypical dental office.  Our space was tastefully designed with decor from Pier One with warm hard wood floors, comfortable seating, and soothing colors-- rather than cold, catalog office furniture. We replaced that familiar “eau du dentiste” with a new scent of natural vanilla or citrus, cinnamon or lavender depending upon the season.  We piped in relaxing spa music, offered our patients pillows and blankets for comfort and chapstick for dry lips. We always had bottles of water and prepasted toothbrushes to help them feel fresh and prepared if they’d come running in from other aspects of their life. These elements set the stage for our main attraction:  our time, patience, empathy, and understanding. We saw our patients as people, not just teeth. We greeted them with a smile and a connection from the heart. We were present with them and they knew they were important to us. We operated from the mindset that we were grateful they chose us. We were their Ambassadors in the office- exuding kindness and love. We treated them like our family-- and got to know about theirs.  We shared a piece of ourselves and often our vulnerability. We took the time to listen and to hear them, offering reassurance and understanding when needed.  We came to quickly realize that in being authentic and our true selves, we were offering something different than any of our competitors.  We found our secret sauce: being the real version of ourselves. Sounds scary, huh? People chose our office because we had built a relationship; they told their friends about us because they trusted us.  They knew that any recommended treatment plan was in their best interest.  We asked them to send us their neighbors and co-workers that were JUST like them, because we wanted to form a practice of folks that were interested in our connection.  I grasped how powerful this was when it came time for my baby shower. Over the years, our patients knew that we were a young couple that really wanted to bring a child into our lives and to create a family.  They would gently and respectfully inquire about our progress at their recall visits; and came to be a source of hope and support as we began our adoption journey. When we were finally able to announce that we would bring home our first child, not only did we receive well wishes, but oodles and oodles of adorable outfits, baby blankets, and keepsakes!  We had more patient and dental friends at the welcome home celebration than from any other aspect of our lives! Over the years, they became our friends and a part of our community. The secret sauce for our business turned into a key element of the foundation of our personal friendships. Building relationships takes time, and we considered the extra ten or fifteen minutes built into a new patient visit or a hygiene appointment as marketing dollars.  You can allocate a large budget for marketing, and if you miss the mark on creating a relationship, that patient will go out your door as fast as they came in. When you take the time to get to know your people, offer them kindness and your authenticity, I believe you are well on your way to preserving them as patient for life.   Dental Billing Tips and News for Pros; Edition #138

agosto 6, 2019

eAssist Spotlight- Christen Jones

Christen Jones has been with eAssist for about 2 years. She loves being part of the dental billing field as she considers herself a “coding geek”. She gets so excited when the newest CDT book comes out! Christen also enjoys doing account audits and many back office tasks. She originally became an eAssist contractor so she could help as many offices as possible meet their goals. eAssist has provided opportunities to share her knowledge, as well as learn more. When asked what her favorite aspect of eAssist is, Christen says, “I like being able to use as many skill sets of my choosing to help doctor's meet their needs. I currently work patient portion, insurance verification and dental billing as both aging and posting team member. I think the diversity in tasks help make my work interesting.” An interesting fact about Christen is she has two dogs that she loves as if they are her children. Charity Tobon, her KC, says this about Christen, “She is amazing, she is open-minded, listens and works great with ICs and offices alike. She has been my shining star to rescue offices in distress! I appreciate her on many levels! Her work ethic and ability to have critical thought process is amazing!”  Dental Billing Tips and News for Pros; Edition #138

agosto 6, 2019

Will Billing Medical Insurances Increase Your Revenue?

Something that a lot of dentists struggle with when evaluating bringing medical billing into their office is the return on investment. Do they do enough procedures that medical will pay to justify the investment in training or outsourced billing? How many patients will really take advantage of the new courtesy of filing to medical? These are great and important questions to evaluate when incorporating any new service to your practice. Most doctors are surprised by the volume of procedures they are able to file to medical for reimbursement. Radiographs are a commonly overlooked item that can be billed to medical insurances. Many practices have cone beam computed tomography (or CBCT) machine in addition to their panorex. CBCTs are often covered under major medical plans if medical necessity is met for diagnosis. If your patient is having a sleep apnea appliance, TMJ appliance or medically necessary surgery you many also successfully bill out periapical radiographs and panoramic radiographs. Surgical procedures such as sinus closures, bone grafting and excisions and biopsies are also common procedures to file to medical insurance. These procedures often meet medical necessity if symptoms and injuries are noted correctly and one knows how to code for diagnosis. Make sure you are also taking detailed records of symptoms and events that contributed to the patient’s current condition. Exams and consultations are another often overlooked area of procedures that can be billed to medical. If your patient is being referred to you for evaluation or you can substantiate medical necessity from their documents than you may be able to successfully file these procedures with the medical insurance. Lastly, implants and extractions are often file and sometimes covered procedures that offices can bill to medical carriers. These procedures are very plan specific so it’s extremely important that benefits and coverage is verified prior to any billing. Offices should also make sure that there are no limitations to covered procedures such as no out of network coverage, the need for preauthorization or coverage for accidental injury only. Medical billing can be a great supplemental revenue stream for your practice and also reduce your patient’s overall out of pocket cost. It is important to keep in mind that while there are lots of procedures that are universally covered there are quite a few that are often not covered. Benefits verification is a vital cornerstone of ensuring you are submitting clean, reimbursable medical claims for your patients.   Dental Billing Tips and News for Pros; Edition #138

agosto 6, 2019

Why patient complaints are good for your practice

No one on your team wants to hear patients complain about the office. These complaints tend to bring team members down, and quite frankly can be a bit irritating. So instead of taking concerns seriously, team members tell themselves the patient complaining is just cranky, and doesn’t know anything about running a dental office anyway.  If this is how your team handles patient complaints, it’s hurting your practice. Think about it. If one patient has taken the time to bring up a concern, chances are other patients are experiencing the same problem—they just didn’t bother to tell you about it. Instead of ignoring them, I suggest you look at patient complaints as what they really are: an opportunity to improve.  That’s right, I’m telling you patient complaints are actually a good thing. Don’t believe me? Here are three ways patient complaints can benefit your practice:  You can fix problems you didn’t know existed. Dental offices are pretty busy places. While everyone does their best to stay on top of issues that come up with practice systems, it certainly isn’t easy. So when someone from the outside tells you about a problem, you should take the opportunity to address it.  Maybe no one realized patients routinely had to wait three weeks or more to get an appointment, and that when their appointment day finally arrived, they had to wait upwards of 30 minutes before being called back. Both issues are signs of inefficient systems, and are problems that might prompt patients to start looking for a new dental home.  When patients tell you they’re not happy about something, listen to what they’re saying and try to determine why it’s an issue. Then, develop a plan to make positive change. You’ll find your practice runs much smoother, leading to improved production numbers and a more robust bottom line.  You’ll earn patient loyalty. Patients don’t like to be ignored. If they tell you about a problem they’re experiencing, they expect you to take them seriously. If you just nod your head and smile and forget about the conversation as soon as they leave, don’t expect these patients to remain loyal to your office.  Instead of trying to end these conversations as soon as possible, find out as much as you can about the problem. Thank patients for bringing up the issue and assure them you’ll work to find a solution. This shows patients you value their input and want them to have a positive experience while visiting your practice. They’ll appreciate the effort, making them more likely to stay loyal.  Patients will refer your office more often. Referrals from happy patients represent one of the best ways to grow your practice. But if patients leave your office feeling irritated, there isn’t much chance they’re going to sing your praises to family and friends. In fact, if they’re upset enough, they might even take to social media to tell their network about the lousy experience they had.  If you really listen to patients and act on the concerns they bring up, they’ll be much more likely to leave your office happy. They’ll notice the changes the next time they come in, and will appreciate the fact you took them seriously. Your practice will be more efficient and patients will have a better experience—and that can lead to an increase in referrals. Not only do practice efficiencies improve, you’ll start to see more new patients as well.   Seek out patient complaints  Patients aren’t going to tell you every time they’re upset—which means you’re missing out on opportunities for growth. I suggest you actually seek out complaints. How? Send surveys. Ask patients about their experience and what they would improve—and then use that information to make positive changes. You can easily set this up through most patient communication systems. Trust me, the effort is well worth the valuable information you’ll receive.  How to take action  What should you do when you receive a complaint? After thanking the patient for bringing up the concern, write it down. That way, you’ll remember exactly what was said. Set aside time to talk about patient complains during team meetings. Everyone can then work together to develop a plan to address complaints.  As tempting as it is, you really shouldn’t ignore patient complaints. Instead, use them to make improvements to your practice. Your patients will be happy you did, and you’ll see a boost in both practice production and your bottom line.  Sally McKenzie is CEO of McKenzie Management, www.mckenziemgmt.com, a full-service, nation-wide dental practice management company. Contact her directly at 877-777-6151 or at sallymck@mckenziemgmt.com.   Dental Billing Tips and News for Pros; Edition #138

agosto 6, 2019

Creating Positive Communication with Difficult Patients

The telephone is still the most important tool for communication in the  dental practice. The person on the phone creates the first impression of the business and often the deciding factor in making an appointment for a potential new patient.   Patient relationships can be challenged by official policy or between the patient and a staff member. A system with scripting on how to diffuse problematic events is excellent customer service and a necessary tool for your practice. Every caller is different as is each issue they want to be resolved.  Skilled customer service representatives design their response based on the verbal behavior of the patient or customer.  Challenging calls can stem from the usual billing and insurance issues but can also be about treatment options, post-operative care and encounters between the patient and other staff members.   Identifying the caller's behavior will help give an idea as to how to manage the call. The basic behavior patterns are as follows. Angry- “I want an apology for the way I was treated.” Demanding- “I want my way, or I am going elsewhere.” Analytical- “Why are you doing the treatment that way and what are the statistics for success, etc.?” Talkative- “I need you to listen to  me because I am paying for your time and I just love to talk.” The Angry Caller can be challenging to even the most experienced business person.  Separating yourself and not going on the defensive are essential skills to learn.  It is recommended to do the following: Listen and let the caller vent and explain their concern in detail without interruption.  Take notes of the critical points of their complaints and remain calm. Don't get caught up in their emotions and become neutral in response.  Agree to investigate their concerns and decide upon a time to return the call. Relate by giving a generalized apology such as “Mr. Smith, I understand how you must feel, and will find a solution to this as soon as possible."  You want to soothe and dilute the situation. Make an offer.  Offer a solution that will solve the patient’s problem.  The situation may require some research or conferring with management so you can tell the patient.  “Mr. Smith,  I will need to look into this situation and get back to you.  Will you be available at 3:00 P.M. tomorrow?"  Be available to make this call or you will have an angrier patient. The Demanding Patients like to take control of the conversation in a  few sentences. They are direct and clear in what they want and may catch the usually very accommodating front desk person off guard with their brusk behavior and demands for action.  With these types listen and take notes. Relate by reassuring the patient that immediate action will be taken. Design a good plan to solve the problem with a timeline and a personal follow-through.  Often times this patient is confused about treatment and needs the attention of the dentist to explain the procedure more clearly. The Analytical Caller wants detailed  accuracy and wants every step of the treatment explained so that they can digest it and find the value in it.  If time was not given to the patient during diagnosis and planning of therapy, you could expect them to call later.  Often the clinical assistant or Treatment Coordinator can answer questions and concerns without involving the dentist.  The Talkative Caller wants attention, and they are usually friendly and enjoyable to speak to for a while. Often the business person is too busy to have a long conversation.  Try the following: Ask closed questions like “Francie, would you like to schedule an appointment?” Don't pause too long between sentences so that the caller cannot interrupt and take control of the conversation. Be friendly but provide a minimal response to questions and divert the caller to the objective to secure an appointment or to answer their question.  Giving patients what they want in communication can be fun and challenging at the same time.  All discussions should be planned to be as positive as possible with the patient being taken care of ethically and kindly.   Dental Billing Tips and News for Pros; Edition #138

julio 3, 2019

Code Tip: D4346

D4346 Scaling in the Presence of generalized moderate or severe gingival inflammation—full mouth, after oral evaluation.  D4346 is a therapeutic service and must be performed after an evaluation by the dentist, typically on the same day to get insurance benefits.  The diagnosis must include generalized moderate to severe gingival inflammation (gingivitis) in the absence of bone loss.   If the patient has attachment loss (bone loss) showing in the radiographs, D4341 or D4342 may be indicated.   Do not use this code to describe a “difficult prophy”.  A difficult prophy is a D1110 that takes longer that a regular schedule hygiene visit and sometimes the patient has to be appointed for another visit to complete the removal of heavy build-up and stain. Dental Billing Tips and News for Pros; Edition #137

julio 3, 2019

Marcie’s Mindfulness Moment | Peace in My Heart

I recently had the opportunity to spend some time with the Speakers Consulting Network group at their annual gathering in Kansas City, MO.  To say I was excited to expand upon connections made last year and to create new ones is an understatement. Not only is this a group of some of the most brilliant minds in our industry, their main foundation is built on HEART.  Collectively, they have a way of establishing comfort in a matter of about five minutes, and by day three…you have found at least 100 new friends! In other professions, groups like this simply do not exist out of threat of competition, jealousy, or a slew of other reasons.  I have been amazed by their graciousness and inspired by the love that exudes from their leadership team. At this event, we were sponsors. In other arenas, sponsors are often placed outside of the space left only to interact with session goers on breaks and before and after the content; often seen as a side item or worse yet, an after-dinner mint to the main entrée.  Not at SCN: we are the poached salmon perfectly paired alongside the filet mignon--included in their arena for the entire conference, encouraged to participate in the break-out sessions, invited to their awards dinner, and even given tickets for raffle prizes. SCN views us as their companions and honestly, it feels like family.  As a sponsor, we are invited to share with the group for about 10 minutes- highlighting the ways that we can collaborate to help our dental office clients.  Several months ago, I was asked to convey our message of delivering peace. Now, most of my days involve speaking to people all day long, helping teams to solve problems-- all from the comfort of my own home, wearing my cozy yoga pants.  I have presented to small groups of people before, but this opportunity, well…did I mention that this is a group of professional speakers? Do you have any idea how daunting and intimidating the idea of this can be… to stand up for the first time on an elevated stage --under bright lights--with cameras catching every angle in front of a group of some of the finest professional dental speakers in the country—without slide notes?!  I imagine we could equate this experience with showcasing a crown prep to a collection of the most renowned group of award-winning prosthodontists with the best lighted loupes and calibration devices that money can buy. However, since I had been welcomed with open arms by the group last year and have kept in touch with many of the 100 friends I made last time, I actually felt comfortable accepting this invitation to share how our teams deliver peace of mind to dental offices and the consultants that serve them.  As the days got closer to showtime, those warm fuzzy feelings that supported my decision to accept this challenge were being replaced by the story inside my head of how daunting and scary this task could be, with the fear of judgement looming. I acknowledged and worked with these feelings as they came up, using self-empathy and trying to replace them with memories of my connections and the experience I had last year. This helped temporarily and then I would find my thoughts drifting back to the story I was telling myself, and the process perpetuated.  I imagine this to be a “normal” reaction to a new experience and stepping outside of your comfort zone; an exercise in growth and learning to incorporate new habits. Once I made my way to the stage, in a carefully chosen outfit that would be incredibly uncomfortable worn in the lotus position-- and equipped with a killer set of expertly crafted slides--I looked into the audience of familiar faces that were oozing with love and support, and the story of fear I had been telling myself diminished. I wouldn’t be human if I said it disappeared altogether, but once I expressed a little vulnerability about first time jitters and felt the empathy in the air, I was able to relax and soak up the experience I was having.  Two minutes into sharing, I found my way out of my head and into my heart because this group opened theirs to me.  I was able to find the comfort to express what I feel so passionate about- how eAssist truly delivers peace of mind.  Our hearts intuitively know authenticity and this group and their leaders definitely have ‘”IT”. Dental Billing Tips and News for Pros; Edition #137  

julio 3, 2019

eAssist Spotlight- Sharon Warren

Sharon Warren has been a part of the eAssist team for the past 3 years. She loves the dental billing field because it is always evolving and she is constantly learning something new, which keeps her on her toes! Sharon applied to be an eAssist contractor because at the time, her husband was on active duty and she came across eAssist on DentalJobs.com. She thought it was a scam until she had a phone interview and had to take all the tests. She completed them all and was told that she would hear from someone in about a month, that was in 2012. Sharon never did hear from anyone and forgot all about eAssist. In September of 2015, she had a mini stroke caused by a blood-clot in her brain, and a seizure. Her job at the time would not allow her to come back and work part time, so they let her go. She was so depressed because she had never been fired from a job before. Sharon was sitting at home just bored out of her mind, and was not allowed to drive for a year, so her husband got to be her chauffeur. She received a call from Melinda Wilhelm in January of 2016 asking if she was available for a full time position. Sharon was so surprised and happy. She says God had a plan and knew when she was going to need eAssist. Sharon’s favorite aspect of eAssist is the relationships that she has built with her fellow eAssisters. Sharon’s KC, Alexis, says this about her: “Sharon has had some difficult offices and has kept with them and completely turned them around. She goes above and beyond for offices and she always has a smile on her face! She is absolutely a joy to talk with and always willing to help others. I love her!” One interesting fact about Sharon is that she loves Zumba! We are happy to have her as a part of our eAssist team.  Dental Billing Tips and News for Pros; Edition #137